Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Esophagus: neoplasia

Contributor(s): James Simpson, Kenneth Simpson

Introduction

  • Rare.
  • Cause: normally metastatic, eg thyroid, pulmonary, mammary.
  • Less commonly primary tumor, eg squamous cell carcinoma Skin: squamous cell carcinoma.
  • Related to incidence of Spirocerca lupi in USA and West Africa - induces metaplastic process Canine spirocercosis which almost inevitably leads to osteosarcoma Osteosarcoma: axial skeleton or fibrosarcoma Fibrosarcoma.
  • Signs: regurgitation.
  • Diagnosis: radiography, endoscopy, biopsy.
  • Treatment: surgical resection.

Pathogenesis

Pathophysiology

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Matros L, Jergens A E, Miles K G & Kluge J P (1994) Megaesophagus and hypomotility associated with esophageal leiomyoma in a dog. JAAHA 30 (1), 15-19 VetMedResource.
  • Rolfe D S, Twedt D C & Selm H B (1994) Chronic regurgitation or vomiting caused by esophageal leiomyoma in 3 dogs. JAAHA 30 (5), 425-430 VetMedResource.
  • Fox S M et al (1988) Spirocercosis in dogs. Comp Cont Educ Pract Vet 10 (7), 807-822 VetMedResource.


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