Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Episcleritis

Contributor(s): David L Williams

Introduction

  • Cause: toxoplasmosis in a small number of cases - mostly idiopathic.
  • Signs: episcleritis is a differential diagnosis for the red eye and may cause ocular irritation but rarely visual disturbance.
  • Diagnosis: a differential diagnosis of the red eye.
  • Treatment: topical steroid as a main treatment.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Has been associated with Toxoplasma infection but only rarely.

Pathophysiology

  • In man, scleritis is often associated with rheumatoid arthritis but no such link with connective tissue disorders is seen in the dog.
  • There seems to be no obvious etiopathogenic mechanism underlying episcleritis and scleritis in the dog. Indeed, the pathology from different cases can be quite varied, suggesting different pathways to disease occurence.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Paulsen M E, Lavach J D, Snyder S P, Severin G A & Eichenbaum J D (1987) Nodular granulomatous episclerokeratitis in dogs - 19 cases (1973-1985). JAVMA 190 (12), 1581-1587 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Williams D L & Crispin S M (1992)diseases of the episclera, sclera and limbus.In:BSAVA Manual of Small Animal Opthalmology.Cheltenham.
  • Fischer C A (1982)Inflammatory disease of the sclera and episclera.In:Comparative Ophthalmic Pathology.Ed. R L Peiffer.


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