ISSN 2398-2969      

Aggression: predatory

icanis
Contributor(s):

Karen Overall


Introduction

  • Aggression under little, if any, autonomic influence.
  • Exhibited towards prey by predatory animals.
  • Usually involves one or more components of predation.
  • Moving objects may trigger it in an animal which does not frequently hunt.
  • Behavior tends to be rewarding → self-reinforcing.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Normal predatory behavior but in inappropriate circumstances.
  • Predatory aggression associated with stalking is always potentially more dangerous than predatory behavior associated with barking at and chasing moving objects or people.

Predisposing factors

General
  • Presence of prey or perceived victim.

Pathophysiology

  • Species relying on killing other animals for food → evolution of modern dog with retention of some ancestral behavior → predatory aggression.
  • Predatory aggression is physiologically a non-autonomic type of aggression.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Beaver B (1983)Clinical Classification of Canine Aggression.Appl Anim Ethol10, 34-43.
  • Overall K L (1997)Clinical behavioral medicine for small animals.pp 114-115, 269.
  • Askew H (1996)Treatment of behavior problems in dogs and cats.pp 178-179.

Organisation(s)

  • Association of Pet Behaviour Counsellors, PO Box 46, Worcester WR8 9YS, UK. Tel/Fax: +44 (0)1386 751151; Email: apbc@petbcent.demon.co.uk; Website: http://www.apbc.co.uk.

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