Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Abdomen: trauma

Contributor(s): Elisa Mazzaferro

Introduction

  • Cause: usually crush injury, eg road traffic accident, or penetrating abdominal wound.
  • Signs: depends on organs involved but often abdominal pain and signs referable to hypovolemic shock.
  • Diagnosis: history, radiography, ultrasonography, laparotomy.
  • Treatment: supportive and may require surgical intervention.
  • Prognosis: often good with appropriate treatment.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Traffic accident.
  • Dog fights.
  • Stabbing.
  • Gunshot wound.

Pathophysiology

  • Injury may involve any abdominal organ.

Urinary system

Liver

  • Liver lobe rupture/hematoma Liver: trauma.
  • Biliary tract rupture.

Spleen

Pancreas

Gastrointestinal tract

  • Rupture.
  • Entrapment of intestines in torn mesentery.
  • Mesenteric thrombosis.

Other

Timecourse

  • If trauma is severe patient usually presents within hours of trauma.
  • Peritonitis Peritonitis secondary to urinary or biliary tract leak may not present for days.

Diagnosis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Treatment

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Outcomes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Beal M A (2005) Approach to the acute abdomen. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim 35 (2), 375-396 PubMed.
  • Heeren V, Edwards L, Mazzaferro E M (2004) Acute abdomen: diagnosis. Comp Contin Educ Pract Vet 26 (5), 350-363 VetMedResource.
  • Heeren V, Edwards L, Mazzaferro E M (2004) Acute abdomen: treatment. Comp Contin Educ Pract Vet 26 (5), 366-373 VetMedResource.


ADDED