Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Taenia serialis

Synonym(s): T. serialis

Contributor(s): Dwight Bowman

Introduction

Classification

Taxonomy

  • Class: Cestoda.
  • Family: Taeniidae.
  • Genus: Taenia.

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Clinical Effects

Epidemiology

Habitat

  • Adult tapeworm in small intestine of dogs that hunt and in other Canidae.
  • Segments and eggs in environment.
  • Metacestode (coenurus) in subcutaneous or intramuscular tissues of rabbits and hares, rarely man, and rarely brain of cats.

Lifecycle

  • See lifecycle diagram Lifecycle Taenia serialis - diagram :
    • Adult tapeworm.
    • Gravid proglottid.
    • Egg.
    • Metacestode (coenurus).

Transmission

Transmission to rabbit/hare
  • Segments migrate out of anus and fall to the ground Taenia spp segment migrating spontaneously from the anus.
  • Segments passed in feces migrate out onto grass or soil.
  • As segments migrate they leave a trail of thousands of eggs in a gelatinous film over the surface of grass, etc Taenia spp egg film from migrating segment.
  • Eggs left by segments on feces can be eaten by flies and deposited over pasture.
  • Eggs eaten with herbage by rabbits or hares.
Transmission to dog
  • Metacestode (coenurus) eaten by hunting dog or dogs fed rabbit meat.

Pathological effects

In dogs

  • The presence of tapeworms (1 or many) usually has little effect on the health of a well-fed dog; burdens are usually only 1-10 tapeworms.
  • Irritation of a segment spontaneously migrating from the anus can cause 'scooting'.
  • Very large numbers of worms in young, poorly-nourished dogs could reduce growth rates Tapeworm in a dogs intestine.
  • Very rarely, obstruction of the intestine from many hundreds of worms can occur.
In rabbit, hare
  • A coenurus developing in the subcutaneous or intramuscular tissues of a pet rabbit is tumor-like and may necessitate surgical removal.

Control

Control via animal

  • Anthelmintic treatment of dog.
  • Dogs that are free to hunt should be treated regularly, ie every 1-2 months.
  • Uncooked rabbit should not be fed to dogs.

Control via chemotherapies

  • Anthelmintics have not been tested specifically for efficacy against T. serialis.
  • Drugs with efficacy against Taenia pisiformis or Taenia hydatigena should be used.
  • Praziquantel Praziquantel.
  • Nitroscanate Nitroscanate (not available in US).
  • Epsiprantel.
  • Fenbendazole Fenbendazole.
  • Mebendazole Mebendazole (not available in US).
  • Dichlorophene not recommended.

Diagnosis

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Further Reading

Publications

Referred papers


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