ISSN 2398-2993      

Milk acidification

obovis
Contributor(s):

Roger Blowey

Keith Cutler


Introduction

  • Acidifying milk is a way of chemically pasteurising and preserving it without the capital investment of a hot pasteuriser.
  • The primary advantage of acidifying milk is to reduce its pathogen load.
    • This is particularly relevant to controlling the transmission of milk- borne pathogens; such as MAP (Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis), responsible for Johne’s disease.
    • It controls coliform levels and therefore scouring.
    • It allows waste milk to be stored and fed over longer periods, thus maintaining consistency of ration.
    • There is some evidence that it destroys antibiotics, particularly those that would not survive abomasal pH.

Advantages and disadvantages

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Preparation

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What can go wrong?

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Further Reading

Publications

`Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Brunton L A, Duncan D, Coldham N G, Snow L C & Jones J R (2012) A survey of antimicrobial usage on dairy farms and waste milk feeding practices in England and Wales. Veterinary Record 171 (12), 296 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Blowey & Griffiths (2017) Potential benefits of acidification when feeding waste milk to calves.
  • Mutharia L & Raymond M (2007) Acidification of raw cow milk and effects upon the culturability of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis. Department of molecular and cellular, University of Geulf, Geulf, ON Canada, N1G 2W1.

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