ISSN 2398-2993      

Dislocations

obovis

Overview

  • Most dislocations in cattle occur due to trauma.
  • Due to the size and weight of adult animals, replacement of dislocations can be very challenging, but is possible.
When dealing with all types of dislocations, safeguarding cattle welfare must be at the forefront of the clinician’s mind.
  • Emergency slaughter of cattle is often most appropriate in cases of acute, traumatic joint dislocations, as the prognosis is generally poor to guarded, and treatment with aftercare is economically non-viable.
  • For emergency slaughter, the following must apply:
    • The animal must be otherwise healthy at the time of antemortem inspection.
    • The dislocation must have happened acutely and recently.
    • Details on emergency slaughter may be found by following this link: Emergency slaughter for human consumption.
  • If cattle are to be transported, you must comply with legislation EC 1/2005:
    • Cattle are not fit for transport if they are unable to move independently without pain or assistance.
    • Lame cattle may be transported but only in single pens with sufficient space to lie down and adequate deep bedding, and preferably in a low loading transport and to a local abattoir.
    • The only exception to this is if the cow is being transported for veterinary treatment.
    • Further details regarding the transportation of cattle may be found by following this link: Transporting cattle

Coxofemoral luxation

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Patella luxation/subluxation

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Fetlock dislocation

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Sacroiliac subluxation and luxation

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Hip dysplasia

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Marchionatti E, Fecteau G & Desrochers A (2014) Traumatic Conditions of the Coxofemoral Joint: Luxation, Femoral Head-Neck Fracture, Acetabular Fracture. Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract 30 (1), 247-264 PubMed.
  • Nichols S & Lardé H (2014) Noninfectious Joint Disease in Cattle. Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract 30 (1), 205-223 PubMed.
  • Pentecost R & Niehaus A (2014) Stifle Disorders: Cranial Cruciate Ligament, Meniscus, Upward Fixation of the Patella. Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract 30 (1), 265-281 PubMed.
  • Hull B L (1996) Fractures and Luxations of the Pelvis and Proximal Femur. Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract 12 (1), 47-58 PubMed.
  • Cox V S (1988) Nonsystemic Causes of the Downer Cow Syndrome. Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract 4 (2), 413-433 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Guard C (2008) Musculoskeletal Disorders. In: Rebhun’s Diseases of Dairy Cattle. 2nd edn. Eds: Divers T J & Peek S F. W B Saunders, USA. pp 467-503.
  • Blowey R W & Weaver A D (2003) Locomotor Disorders. In: Color Atlas of Diseases and Disorders of Cattle. 2nd edn. Eds: Blowey R W & Weaver A D. Mosby, UK. pp 83-122. 
  • Stringhalt in cattle. Veterinary Clinical Cases video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WslqhVUUbUk 

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