Bovis ISSN 2398-2993

Bull: lack of libido

Contributor(s): Jonathan Statham , Alexander Corbishley

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Introduction

  • Libido is an important consideration with regard to bull reproductive performance.
  • Research has shown libido has a strong genetic component.
  • Using bulls with high libido may benefit pregnancy rate, time to conception, length of calving season, homogenicity of weaned calves and therefore efficient use of labor.
  • When presented with a bull that shows less interest in mating the veterinary surgeon must determine whether this is in fact a bull with inherently low libido or whether other conditions are present which are resulting in a reduced ability/reluctance to mount.
  • Although libido should form part of the Bull Breeding Soundness Evaluation Bull Breeding Soundness Evaluation, in practice it is rarely directly assessed by the veterinary surgeon and often is left to farmer observation and reporting.
  • Investigation of potential lack of libido must consider the wide range of possible differential diagnoses before a definitive diagnosis of lack of libido may be safely concluded.
  • Lack of libido is essentially a diagnosis of exclusion.
  • Primary lack of libido is untreatable and usually results in culling.

Conditions affecting ability to mate

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Special considerations - primary lack of libido

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Maintaining libido in working bulls

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMed Resource.
  • Statham J M E (2010) Differential diagnosis of scrotal enlargement in bulls. In Practice 32 pp 2-9.
  • Penny C (2009) The development of a UK bull breeding soundness evaluation certificate. Cattle Practice 17, pp 64-70.
  • Eppink E (2006) A survey of bull breeding soundness evaluations in the south east of Scotland. Cattle Practice 13 pp 205-209.
  • Penny C (2005) Practical semen collection and examination techniques for breeding soundness evaluation of bulls. Cattle Practice 13, pp 199-204.
  • McGowan M (2004) Approach to conducting bull breeding soundness evaluations. In Practice 26 pp 485-491.
  • Entwistle K & Fordyce G (2003) Evaluating and reporting bull fertility. Australian Association of Cattle Veterinarians, Brisbane, Australia.

Other sources of information

  • Aiello S E & Moses M A (2016) Reproductive System. In: Merck Veterinary Manual. 11th Edn. Kenilworth, USA. pp 1321-1408.
  • Chenoweth P (2015) Bull Health and Breeding Soundness. In: Bovine Medicine. 3rd Edn, Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, pp 246-261.
  • Logue D N & Crawshaw W M (2004) Bull infertility. In: Bovine Medicine – Diseases and Husbandry of Cattle. 2nd Edn. Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Oxford. pp 594-626.


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