ISSN 2398-2993      

Anesthetic monitoring: overview

obovis

Introduction

  • Due to the infrequency with which bovine anesthesia is performed and the fact that this prey species is often much sicker than it appears, patients are more difficult to anesthetise safely than small animals or humans. For this reason, effective monitoring is a vital part of any anesthetic procedure.
  • Monitoring as close to continuously as possible, with correct interpretation of results, can warn of impending problems and emergencies.
  • A wide variety of equipment exists to aid monitoring of anesthesia in human patients and veterinary species, but it is still important to use the 'hands and eyes-on' approach, rather than relying totally on the equipment.
  • Monitoring of the respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous systems are particularly important as in other species
  • Maintaining a good written anesthetic record is essential, both to aid in the detection of undesirable trends and also for legal reasons, should anything go wrong during the procedure.
  • The aims of monitoring anesthesia in the cow are to maintain an adequate depth of anesthesia for the surgical procedure and to ensure that all body systems are functioning as near to normal as possible.

Clinical techniques

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Use of monitoring equipment

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Other variables

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Seddighi R & Doherty T J (2016) Field sedation and anesthesia of ruminants. Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract 32 (3), 553-570 PubMed.
  • Abrahamsen E J (2013) Chemical restraint and injectable anesthesia of ruminants. Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract 29 (1), 209-27 PubMed.
  • Smith G (2013) Extralabel use of anesthetic and analgesic compounds in cattle. Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract 29 (1), 29-45 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Valverde A & Sinclair M (2015) Chapter 49 ruminant anesthesia. In: Veterinary anesthesia and analgesia. Blackwell Publishing.
  • Clarke K & Trim C (2014) Patient monitoring and clinical measurement and anaesthesia of cattle. In: Veterinary anesthesia. 11th edn. Elsevier.

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