ISSN 2398-2993      

Ringworm

obovis

Synonym(s): Trichophton verrucosum.


Ringworm

  • Ringworm is an extremely common, infectious fungal condition.
  • Caused by Trichophyton verrucosum.
  • It is spread from animal to animal (and to humans), by direct contact, or via spores in the animal’s environment (indirect contact).
  • T verrucosum infects the superficial layers of the skin and hair shafts.
  • The spores can survive for long periods in the environment, sometimes up to years.
  • It can spread to other in-contact animals and man (Zoonotic Zoonotic).
  • Although unsightly, ringworm usually has only minor impacts on animal health, growth and farm profits.
    • Some studies have demonstrated negative effects on growth rates.
    • May be economically significant if damaged hides are destined for the leather industry.

What are the signs of Ringworm?

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Risk factors

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How to diagnose ringworm

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How to treat

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How to prevent ringworm

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Zoonotic risk

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