Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Mushroom poisoning

Contributor(s): Rosalind Dalefield, Patricia Talcott

Introduction

  • There have been a number of cases of dogs voluntarily eating poisonous mushrooms.
  • There are 8 types of mushroom toxin. Except in the case of muscarine and amatoxin/phalloidin poisoning, there are no specific antidotes, and mushroom identification is a specialist field. Therefore, cases of suspected mushroom poisoning should be treated symptomatically, according to the dictum Treat the patient, not the poison.
  • Gastrointestinal signs (vomiting Vomiting ; less commonly abdominal tenderness, diarrhea, anorexia) are fairly consistent signs observed with most mushroom ingestion.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Ingestion of poisonous mushrooms.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Vogel G, Tuchweber B, Trost W & Mengs U (1984) Protection by silibinin against Amanita phalloides intoxication in beagles. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 73 (3), 355-362 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • K H Plumlee (ed) (2004) Clinical Veterinary Toxicology. Mosby, Inc.
  • Peterson and Talcott (eds) (2001)Small Animal Toxicology.WB Saunders Company.
  • N J Turner and A F Szczawinski (1991)Common Poisonous Plants and Mushrooms of North America.Timber Press.

Organisation(s)


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