Canis ISSN: 2398-2942

Esophagitis

Contributor(s): Ken Harkin, James Simpson

Introduction

  • Signs: dysphagia, anorexia, excessive salivation and regurgitation. Pain on eating.
  • Causes: gastro-esophageal reflux, foreign bodies, ingestion of caustic chemicals or hot food, acute or chronic vomiting following anesthesia and surgery.
  • Diagnosis: endoscopy.
  • Treatment: correct underlying cause, antacids, nothingper osfor 24 hours.
  • Prognosis: good with appropriate management.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Chemicals, thermal, foreign body - whole esophagus affected.
  • Gastric disease, gastro-esophageal reflux, hiatal hernia.
  • Post-general anesthesia - distal esophagus affected.
  • Post-surgery, especially if patient was placed head lower than body.

Predisposing factors

General
  • General anesthetic → gastro-esophageal reflux.
  • Acute or chronic vomiting.

Pathophysiology

  • Initial insult:
    • Thermal.
    • pH.
    • Foreign body.
  • Motility disorder at gastro-esophageal level.
  • Vicious cycle establishes - condition maintained.
  • May lead to stricture formation.
  • Inflammation causes motility disorder - vicious cycle develops.

Timecourse

  • Variable dependent on etiology - hours if chemical ingestion.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Raptopoculos D & Galatos A D (1994) Gastro-esophageal reflux during anesthesia in the dog. Vet Ann 34, 218-227 VetMedResource.

Other publications

  • Washabau R J (1996) Swallowing disorders. In:Manual of Canine and Feline Gastroenterology. L D A Thomas, J W Simpson & E J Hall (Eds). BSAVA, Cheltenham. pp 67.


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