ISSN 2398-2993      

Line block and inverted L-block

obovis
Contributor(s):

Karin Mueller

Mike Reynolds

Synonym(s): Regional anesthesia


Introduction

  • Described here is desensitization of the flank for laparotomy.
  • The line block can also be used to desensitize any area of the abdominal or thoracic wall (for example for umbilical hernia repair Umbilical hernia: surgical correction, thoracotomy, wound repair, or removal of a body wall mass).

Uses

  • Enables standing right or left flank laparotomy Flank laparotomy (for procedures like cesarean section Cesarean section; displaced abomasum Left displaced abomasum: surgical correction; exploratory laparotomy; other surgery involving the gastro-intestinal tract, urinary tract or reproductive tract).
  • Facilitates wound repair and removal of a mass involving the flank.
  • As an adjunct in a patient under general anesthesia Anesthetizing cattle as part of multi-modal anesthesia and analgesia.

Advantages

  • Inexpensive and minimal equipment needs.
  • Minimal side effects.
  • Allows standing surgery.
  • Minimal patient recovery time.
  • For advantages and disadvantages of Line vs. Inverted-L block, please see below under ‘Decision taking’.

Disadvantages

  • Depending on accuracy of block placement, the area of desensitization and muscle relaxation can be variable, in particular, deeper tissue layers.
  • The area of desensitization is restricted to the extent of the block in a dorsoventral direction.
  • Good restraint of the animal is required.
  • The high volume of anesthetic required poses a toxicity risk, in particular in smaller patients (like calves).
  • No post-operative analgesia is provided.
Only the body wall is desensitized. This may be insufficient for surgery involving inflamed abdominal contents (for example, an intussusception).
 

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Edmondson M A (2016) Local, regional, and spinal anesthesia in ruminants. Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract 32 (3), 535-552 PubMed

Other sources of information

  • Dugdale A (2010) Veterinary Anasthesia: Principles to Practice. Wiley-Blackwell, USA.

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